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TEDxEunji: Fact/Fiction

I really liked this TED talk, I had never watched it but the title of it stood out for me as I was browsing through the videos. The title of this talk is Markham Nolan: How to separate fact and fiction online. This title stood out because this practice was the first thing we were assigned to do as part of this course. We had to look for articles related to our topics. These articles had to follow the CRAAP (still can’t get over that name) guidelines: current, relevant, authority, accuracy, and purpose. As I searched for interesting yet CRAAP approved articles, I encountered articles that weren’t very reliable.

Markham Nolan is a journalist in the Ireland. At the begginning of his TED talk, Nolan points out how the relationship with the media has changed. Before the audience would react to news. Now, journalist react to the audience.  This same audience  helps them find the news. The internet has allowed this relationship to change. The audience can now help journalists figure out how to react to news and what is the best angle to take. We, make these news outlets now what it is we want to hear. This practice has evolved because it is through the internet that this happens quick, in real time.

Nolan tells us that today, even though there is a greater flow of information, there are free internet tools that help us verify the legitimacy of our sources allowing us to filter the truth from the lies.

I would like to end this post quoting Nolan’s closing statement of his TED talk.

“But here’s the thing. Algorithms are rules. They’re binary. They’re yes or no, they’re black or white.Truth is never binary. Truth is a value. Truth is emotional, it’s fluid, and above all, it’s human. No matter how quick we get with computers, no matter how much information we have, you’ll never be able to remove the human from the truth-seeking exercise, because in the end, it is a uniquely human trait.”

nolanted

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